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New blockade leading to Winnipeg landfill set up

A new blockade has been set up on the road leading to the Brady Landfill on Sept. 27, 2023. (Source: Jamie Dowsett/CTV News Winnipeg) A new blockade has been set up on the road leading to the Brady Landfill on Sept. 27, 2023. (Source: Jamie Dowsett/CTV News Winnipeg)

Another blockade leading to the Brady Landfill in Winnipeg has appeared as conversations around searching the Prairie Green Landfill for the remains of two Indigenous women continues in the province.

As of Wednesday evening, people could be seen sitting in lawn chairs holding signs that say 'Search the Landfill'. There is also a second sign calling for a search of the landfill is on the road and a vehicle is behind the individuals.

In an email to CTV News a spokesperson for the city of Winnipeg said officials are aware of the blockade and the alternate route has been opened as a "temporary measure."

"However, the court injunction preventing the blockade of the road remains in place. Winnipeg Police are also aware of the situation and are currently liaising with individuals at the scene," the spokesperson said.

CTV News Winnipeg has reached out to police for comment.

Protesters started blocking the road to the Brady Landfill in early July after Heather Stefanson said the Manitoba government would not search the Prairie Green Landfill for the remains of two women who are believed to be in the landfill – Morgan Harris and Marcedes Myran.

On July 14, a judge granted a temporary court injunction to remove the blockade and the blockade was removed on July 18.

The topic of searching the landfill has taken centre stage in the last week as the Progressive Conservatives have been campaigning that their party won't search the landfill.

Stefanson brought it up during a leaders' debate on Sept. 21 and an ad posted in the Winnipeg Free Press on Sept. 23 made mention of not searching the landfill.

The provincial election happens on Oct. 3.

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