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Salvation Army donations not keeping up with demand at Manitoba thrift stores

The Salvation Army Thrift Store on McPhillips Street in Winnipeg, Man. is pictured on June 10, 2024. (Jamie Doswett/CTV News Winnipeg) The Salvation Army Thrift Store on McPhillips Street in Winnipeg, Man. is pictured on June 10, 2024. (Jamie Doswett/CTV News Winnipeg)
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A Manitoba thrift store is calling for donations as it struggles to keep its shelves stocked amid soaring demand.

Salvation Army says sales are up about 13 per cent year-over-year in its Manitoba thrift stores.

Managing director Ted Troughton credits that in part to a new group of thrifters trying to save money in these inflationary times.

“We’re seeing a lot more people coming into our stores, a lot more interest in thrifting because they’re trying to find ways to make their dollars go further,” he said.

While donations are still growing, they’re not keeping pace with demand.

Stores in Manitoba have had to bring in products from other markets to keep shelves stocked.

While all donations are welcome, Troughton says they are particularly in need of household items like kitchenware, small appliances, lighting, and décor.

Troughton says donations to the Salvation Army Thrift Stores help to fund the organization’s social services in over 400 communities across Canada.

Additionally, the group diverted more than 94 million pounds of items from landfills last year.

“It’s a really great opportunity to make a difference in your community, just by bringing a couple of bags, a couple of boxes of donations from your home.”

- With files from CTV’s Daniel Halmarson

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