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Where Winnipeggers can view the 'Humbug' sign

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The 'Humbug' sign hanging proudly from an apartment block in the Polo Park area has become a cherished Christmas tradition for many Winnipeggers.

However, the 50-year-old tradition was in jeopardy this year as a construction project at the apartment building meant it couldn’t be hung. But, one Winnipeg brewery decided to step in and perform a Christmas miracle by displaying a replica of the sign on its roof.

“We decided that construction had already ruined everyone’s summer, we weren’t going to let it ruin everyone’s winter,” said Tim Hudek, operations manager at One Great City.

The 'Humbug' sign on One Great City. (Nov. 27, 2023 Source: Scott Andersson/CTV News Winnipeg)

Hudek explained that once the staff at One Great City learned that the sign wouldn’t be going up this year, they made the decision to build their own sign that closely resembles the original.

He said the ‘Humbug’ sign has been a staple in the city for 50 years that began with a man named Sid Farmer.

“When you look at [the sign] it’s very playful. It’s very unique to Winnipeg, very Winnipeg-esque,” Hudek said.

“We just wanted to continue that whole vibe that goes with it.”

The 'Humbug' sign on One Great City. (Source: Scott Andersson)

Hudek noted that the brewery did reach out to the Farmer family to ensure it was alright for One Great City to put up the sign, adding that they were very pleased about it.

“As long as the originator of it is remembered and the story has been told then our duty has been done,” he said.

The sign can be found on top of One Great City, located on Ness Avenue. It faces northeast onto the intersection of St. James and Ness.

- With files from CTV’s Danton Unger.

The 'Humbug' sign on a Polo Park area apartment block has become a tell-tale signal of Christmas in Winnipeg for years. (Source: Dan Timmerman/ CTV News Winnipeg)

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