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Students donate homemade dog beds to Brandon Humane Society

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Students in Brandon made sure that dogs in need of a forever home have a safe place to curl up.

The Grade 7 home economics class at River Heights School stitched up multiple dog beds for the Brandon Humane Society.

Celine Cramer, the home economics teacher, said the dog beds were something students could make once they finished their final projects.

It was part of the Co-op sustainable Dog Bed Project.

The Grade 7 home economics class at River Heights School stitched up multiple dog beds for the Brandon Humane Society, who tested them out n Feb. 28, 2024. (Submitted by Celine Cramer)

“All of our fabric that we use for the projects is from scrap fabric,” Cramer said. “So we have them make the beds out of all the stuff that would have been in the trash or would have gone in the garbage and make sort of a quilt work fabric and then make it into a dog bed itself.”

As part of the project, several dogs from the Humane Society visited the school to test out the beds, something the students enjoyed.

“I think it's hard to be a dog in a humane society,” Cramer said. “This is something that we can give them that they can lie on that's not concrete, so it gives them a little cushion off the ground and probably helps keep them warmer.”

The classroom was able to donate 12 beds to the Humane Society.

Cramer said she is hoping to continue the project in future years.

“I never want my kids to just sit around,” she said. “When they're done, learning doesn't stop. You can always continue learning. This is such a great group-based project that prepares them to work collaboratively with everyone.”

The Grade 7 home economics class at River Heights School stitched up multiple dog beds for the Brandon Humane Society, who tested them out n Feb. 28, 2024. (Submitted by Celine Cramer)

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