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The lottery that benefits a slew of Manitoba charities

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Manitoba has long been known as one of the most generous provinces in Canada and there are many different organizations asking for your support.

However, if deciding which one to choose is too difficult, there's a solution with a new lottery that will benefit dozens of local charitable organizations.

The Wildlife Haven Rehabilitation Centre is one of the organizations taking part in this lottery as these days, the wildlife rescue has a lot of tenants.

"The budget is quite high. We strive to raise over $1 million every single year,” said Zoe Nakata, executive director of the Wildlife Haven Rehabilitation Centre.

The rescue has a number of fundraising activities and now they're trying something new by teaming up with 27 other charitable organizations for One Great Lottery.

"Everyone likes a lottery, and so we thought, let's pitch this, let's see who comes on board,” said Jessica miller, CEO of the Winnipeg Humane Society.

“We thought maybe we would get five partners and when we got 28 we were ecstatic"

One Great Lottery began in 2022 as a collaboration between the Winnipeg Humane Society and the Misericordia Health Centre Foundation.

Now, the list of organizations taking part is much bigger and includes the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, Royal Winnipeg Ballet, Habitat for Humanity Manitoba and the Bruce Oake Memorial Foundation.

"Instead of fighting each other for funding, we're actually joining forces and coming together,” said Greg Kyllo, executive director of the Bruce Oake Recovery Centre

“And it's a win-win when you come together."

Ticket buyers can direct the proceeds from their purchase to the charity of their choice or choose to share it amongst them all.

"Hopefully all of us will be getting the extra revenue that we all need so desperately in these difficult economic times, Miller said.

More information on the lottery can be found online. 

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