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Pothole claims skyrocketing after Winnipeg’s mild winter

A pothole filled with muddy water on Abinojii Mikanah, formerly Bishop Grandin Boulevard, is pictured on April 15, 2024. (Scott Andersson/CTV News Winnipeg) A pothole filled with muddy water on Abinojii Mikanah, formerly Bishop Grandin Boulevard, is pictured on April 15, 2024. (Scott Andersson/CTV News Winnipeg)
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New data shows this year’s spring melt has been particularly treacherous for Manitoba drivers, putting us on pace to record the highest number of pothole claims in the past six years.

According to Manitoba Public Insurance, there have already been 1,634 pothole claims filed as of April 7, with 971 coming in March alone.

That has already surpassed the total number seen in all of 2019, 2020 and 2021 respectively.

This year’s pothole claims are also on pace to surpass the high figures seen in 2022, when 5,395 pothole claims were filed.

That year, there were 701 pothole claims during the first three months of 2022. In the same period in 2024, there have already been 1,466 claims.

This year’s early melt has also kept city crews busy. A city spokesperson tells CTV News Winnipeg that they’ve already filled over 76,000 potholes this year, which is double the amount filled during the same time last year.

While potholes can prove damaging to your vehicle, MPI has a few tips to safely navigate them, like scanning as far down the road from you as possible to seek out the costly craters, slowing down as much as possible beforehand and avoiding swerving.

The insurer also says potholes often develop in the curb lane where water can accumulate, masking the schisms. Drivers are encouraged to approach puddles with the same caution as they would a pothole.

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