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Gimli short-term rental regulations a step closer to reality

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New regulations and an accommodation tax for short-term rentals are one step closer to reality in Gimli.

The bylaw containing the new set of regulations was given first reading by Gimli council last week. It is the latest step in the process that started back in March for the rural municipality.

READ MORE: Gimli eyes short-term rental regulations

The regulations will require anyone wanting to operate a short-term rental property in Gimli to have a license, which the rural municipality says will cost $200 per dwelling.

Also under the new regulations, operators will need to post signs informing guests of the 'quiet hours' for Gimli which are between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. They can have no more than two adults staying overnight in one bedroom, and no more than three dogs which are required to be leashed always.

Council also gave first reading to a new five per cent accommodation tax on all short-term rentals, hotels and motels. The rural municipality said the revenues from the tax will be used for local tourism initiatives and development in the Gimli Waterfront Area.

"The Accommodation Tax By-law is a significant step towards ensuring the safety and well-being of the community while supporting the tourism industry and local businesses," a notice from the rural municipality reads.

It notes an accommodation tax will need to be approved by the province before it can be implemented.

The bylaws still require second and third reading before they take effect, which is expected to happen on Dec. 13. The rural municipality says anyone with concerns can contact the RM by email

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